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B03001. HISPANIC OR LATINO ORIGIN BY SPECIFIC ORIGIN - Universe: TOTAL POPULATION
Data Set: 2006 American Community Survey
Survey: American Community Survey


NOTE. Although the American Community Survey (ACS) produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates, it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns and estimates of housing units for states and counties.

For more information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see Survey Methodology.
View the collapsed version of this table.  Geographies missing from this table are listed below the table.

United States
Estimate Margin of Error
Total: 299,398,485 *****
Not Hispanic or Latino 255,146,207 +/-10,602
Hispanic or Latino: 44,252,278 +/-10,603
Mexican 28,339,354 +/-87,068
Puerto Rican 3,987,947 +/-48,136
Cuban 1,520,276 +/-30,458
Dominican (Dominican Republic) 1,217,225 +/-35,099
Central American: 3,372,090 +/-56,573
Salvadoran 1,371,666 +/-42,389
Guatemalan 874,799 +/-29,272
Honduran 490,317 +/-22,393
Nicaraguan 295,059 +/-16,197
Panamanian 123,631 +/-8,764
Other Central American 111,825 +/-10,564
Costa Rican 104,793 +/-9,163
South American: 2,421,297 +/-42,518
Colombian 801,363 +/-26,498
Ecuadorian 498,705 +/-20,718
Peruvian 435,368 +/-18,921
Argentinean 183,427 +/-12,052
Venezuelan 177,866 +/-12,302
Chilean 104,861 +/-8,684
Bolivian 82,322 +/-9,294
Other South American 70,821 +/-7,160
Uruguayan 50,538 +/-7,261
Paraguayan 16,026 +/-3,859
Other Hispanic or Latino: 3,394,089 +/-46,494
Spanish 700,373 +/-18,900
Spaniard 377,140 +/-14,618
Spanish American 64,162 +/-5,202
All other Hispanic or Latino 2,252,414 +/-42,151

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 American Community Survey

Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability. The degree of uncertainty for an estimate arising from sampling variability is represented through the use of a margin of error. The value shown here is the 90 percent margin of error. The margin of error can be interpreted roughly as providing a 90 percent probability that the interval defined by the estimate minus the margin of error and the estimate plus the margin of error (the lower and upper confidence bounds) contains the true value. In addition to sampling variability, the ACS estimates are subject to nonsampling error (for a discussion of nonsampling variability, see Accuracy of the Data). The effect of nonsampling error is not represented in these tables.

While the 2006 American Community Survey (ACS) data generally reflect the December 2005 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) definitions of metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, in certain instances the names, codes, and boundaries of the principal cities shown in ACS tables may differ from the OMB definitions due to differences in the effective dates of the geographic entities.

Explanation of Symbols:
1. An '**' entry in the margin of error column indicates that either no sample observations or too few sample observations were available to compute a standard error and thus the margin of error. A statistical test is not appropriate.
2. An '-' entry in the estimate column indicates that either no sample observations or too few sample observations were available to compute an estimate, or a ratio of medians cannot be calculated because one or both of the median estimates falls in the lowest interval or upper interval of an open-ended distribution.
3. An '-' following a median estimate means the median falls in the lowest interval of an open-ended distribution.
4. An '+' following a median estimate means the median falls in the upper interval of an open-ended distribution.
5. An '***' entry in the margin of error column indicates that the median falls in the lowest interval or upper interval of an open-ended distribution. A statistical test is not appropriate.
6. An '*****' entry in the margin of error column indicates that the estimate is controlled. A statistical test for sampling variability is not appropriate.

Source:  http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DTTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=01000US&-ds_name=ACS_2006_EST_G00_&-mt_name=ACS_2006_EST_G2000_B03001